In the Spirit of Earth Day, Join Live Below the Line!

April 24, 2014 by Lindsay McNamara
In the Spirit of Earth Day, Join Live Below the Line!

Each year, Earth Day calls for global citizens to examine their impact on the environment and learn new (or more) ways to be environmentally friendly. Here at The Hunger Project, we believe everything is connected and that — hunger is inextricably linked to a nexus of factors including decent work, health, education, environmental protection and social justice — only in solving these together will any of these issues be resolved on a sustainable basis. We must work tirelessly to empower women and promote gender equality, healthy nutrition for children around the world and hold our governments accountable to protect the environment.

To understand this holistic approach a bit more, I began to think about The Hunger Project’s recent partnership with the Global Poverty Project on a campaign called Live Below the Line. After taking a depth breath, I decided to join the Live Below the Line challenge.

I am standing with thousands of people around the world who are taking the Live Below the Line challenge to raise funds and awareness for the 1.2 billion people in our world who live in extreme poverty.

From April 28May 2, join me in spending $1.50 a day on food and beverage for 5 days to change the way people think about extreme poverty – all while supporting The Hunger Project’s work in villages worldwide.

I want to experience what it is like to live in poverty and the choices (or lack thereof) my fellow human beings on the other side of the globe (and right here in New York City) make every day.

I recycle; even separate my bottles and cans from paper and cardboard. I don’t drink bottled water. I take public transportation to work. I bring my canvas bags to the grocery store. I try not to consume too much. These small actions pale in comparison to the reduction my carbon footprint will have as I try to eat and drink on $1.50 a day for five days. My fellow environmentalists, I encourage you to Live Below the Line with me and take a hard look at all that you consume in five days.

If you had the opportunity or the chance to change the world and be a part of the Live Below the Line dialogue, to see yourself as a member of the planet as a whole, would you take it?

How can you get involved?

The Washington Weekly - February 13, 2013

February 13, 2013 by John Coonrod
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, is in Washington, DC to strengthen THP's seat at the table of international development. This week: New Action Item! THP Rises to Halt Gender Based Violence; Obama Plugs Development; Post-2015 Update From Monrovia; Upcoming Events

One Billion Rising: Demanding An End To Violence Against Women

February 13, 2013 by Communications Intern
OneBillionRising2013.jpg
Violence against women is a serious public health issue that has received recent attention with cases surfacing around the world, particularly in India, Bangladesh and Turkey. In response and protest, activists are coming together to raise a global voice this Valentine's Day in a movement called One Billion Rising. The Hunger Project strongly believes it is important to take part in this movement and to take a stand for the 1 in 3 women who are raped or beaten in their lifetime. As an organization, we will take part in a One Billion Rising events around the world. If you, too, believe these women deserve to be heard, JOIN US!

The Washington Weekly - February 5, 2013

February 5, 2013 by John Coonrod
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, is in Washington, DC to strengthen THP's seat at the table of international development. This week: Take this Advocacy Survey now! Also, Crusade Against Hunger in Mexico; Obama strengthens commitment to gender; New Briefing Book Available; Post-2015 High-Level Panel; and a reminder about One Billion Rising.

An Investor's Viewpoint: Leadership in Unlikely Places

January 24, 2013 by Communications Intern
Children in Uganda by Emma Isaacs
Emma Isaacs, CEO and “Chief Chick” of Business Chicks, a national community for women in business, writes about her unforgettable experience in Uganda for the Business Chicks Immersion and Leadership Program. Emma and her fellow members of Business Chicks plan to continue working with THP-Australia on creating a brighter and more empowering future for the people of Bangladesh and Uganda in the years to come.

The Washington Weekly - January 18, 2013

January 18, 2013 by John Coonrod
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, is in Washington, DC to strengthen THP's seat at the table of international development. This week: Local democracy in India and Bangladesh;spotlighting what works; the people's voice and major reports in post-2015 development goals; and One Billion Rising to halt gender-based violence.

The Washington Weekly - January 7, 2013

January 7, 2013 by John Coonrod
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, is in Washington, DC to strengthen THP's seat at the table of international development. This week: Debriefing 2012 and Launching 2013, Halting Gender Based Violence, Local Democracy Consultation in India, President Obama appoints Global Development Council

Top 10 Trends in Ending Hunger and Poverty During 2012

December 20, 2012 by John Coonrod
Woman partner at Ndereppe Epicenter in Senegal runs her own community story - Top 10 Trends in Ending Hunger and Poverty in 2012
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, brings you the top 10 trends in ending hunger and poverty during 2012!

Let's See Those Selfless Tees!

December 26, 2012 by Sara D Wilson
In October, we partnered with Selfless Tees to offer you a limited edition Hunger Project t-shirt. Now that you've received your shirts, let's see them! Our very own Leanna Beaber models hers here!

The Washington Weekly - December 13, 2012

December 13, 2012 by John Coonrod
The Hunger Project's Executive VP, John Coonrod, has moved from New York City to Washington, DC to strengthen THP's seat at the table of international development. This week: Latin American leaders on the policy front lines; the private sector and Africa's woman food farmers; and a new Lancet series on disease burden.
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